Dis-location

A different example of such temporal-spatial puzzles is found in Room for love 1990, which contains a conversational or ‘tête-à-tête’ chair, an S-shaped two-seater sofa, sometimes called a ‘love chair’. In such a chair, two people sit in close proximity facing in opposite directions, although they can also converse face-to-face. For Hastings, the analogy alludes to the often-fraught dynamics of social interaction as well as to the reception of art: ‘the chair was intended as a conversation with oneself when one looks at a work of art – where two opposing views are struck – literally –while there is also this third, reconciliatory view of turning halfway toward the oppositeview’.1

1. Gail Hastings, private communication with author.
2. Thierry de Duve, Kant after Duchamp, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA 1996, p 218. 

Andrew McNamara, MAKING SPACE FOR THE INVISIBLE ARCHITECTURE OF THE SOCIAL, 2007

Exhibition
Date: 09/Oct/1990 to 26/Oct/1990
At: RMIT Gallery, Melbourne
List of Works: by Gail Hastings
Room for Love
Bibliography: Carolyn Barnes, ‘Dis-location’, in Robert Owen (ed.), Dis-location, exhibition catalogue, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne 1990, p.6.
RMIT Gallery

Storey Hall
344 Swanston Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Australia

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