To make a work of ordered art

Year: 1997
Ontology: standalone

Medium: watercolour and lead pencil on paper, custom-made book, vinyl over MDF, acrylic on MDF, acrylic on canvas, lead pencil and acrylic on walls

HxWxD cm: at least 2.5h x 5d x 6w m

[test of catalogue image that includes all four objects: L. I. F. and E.]

Encyclopaedia of Order in Art

To put some order into this work of art and straighten three of the four objects L. I. F. E. in disarray below, simply follow these directions. Hold a pencil above the objects, close your eyes and think of what in your life you feel needs sorting out. Let your hand fall and select an object. Repeat twice. Open your eyes and note the time _______ and date _______ of this ordering. Take the first selected object, _____, and align it with the painting on page 27; the second object, _____, with the plinth; and the third object, _____, with the bookshelf. This leaves object ___ in disarray, a testimony to what is lost. The work of ordered art is now complete.

—– page 1 —-

[framed watercolour page 1 that, upon completion, leaves only object I. to remain]

Encyclopaedia of Order in Art

To put some order into this work of art and straighten three of the four objects L. I. F. E. in disarray below, simply follow these directions. Hold a pencil above the objects, close your eyes and think of what in your life you feel needs sorting out. Let your hand fall and select an object. Repeat twice. Open your eyes and note the time    4:29pm       and date    Monday 27.1.97     of this ordering. Take the first selected object,    F.    , and align it with the painting on page 27; the second object,    E.    , with the plinth; and the third object,    L.    , with the bookshelf. This leaves object    I.     in disarray, a testimony to what is lost. The work of ordered art is now complete.

—– page 1 —-

 

[Book, p.30]

———- The Order of Looking ———-

Chapter L.

Published by the Bureau of Looking 1997

[Book, p.32]

The Bureau of Looking has recently observed from latest statistics that not every part of a work of art is looked at.

To understand this phenomenon further, the Bureau has devised this book of a continuous red-watercolour line as a means by which to analyse whether any underlying pattern, or order, dictates which parts to the line are looked at and which parts are not.

The Bureau therefore asked for your assistance by limiting — or expanding — the parts of this line the you look at to 27, and to number each part, i.e. page, in the order seen (excluding, however, the pages previous to this one).

[Book, p.121]

LOOKED AT number             27