difficult art decisions: walls four and five

Encyclopaedia of Difficult Art Decisions

We were asked by an art authority to install a wall protector on wall 5, to save the wall from being marked by people leaning against it while discussing the artwork on wall 4. We promptly attended to the task, however upon completing it we discovered that the wall protector, in not only being the same colour as the artwork on wall 4, but also made of the same vinyl material, confused the distinction between itself and the artwork. Now we’re not authorities on art, but it seemed obvious to us that this was a matter of great concern, for the general art public might mistakenly connect the art object and the wall protector, as is easy to do, and wastefully attempt to fathom the meaning of the connection. To avoid this we searched for other protectors and found the last two; however, neither was better that the first, as one was also of the same colour as the artwork, and the other had been patched with a piece of vinyl that was surprisingly a similar size as the artwork, as well as the came colour. We found it impossible to decide just which of the three was the least confusing, and therefore the most suitable, so we filed a ‘Difficult Art Decision’ report in order for an art authority to consider and solve the matter. Meanwhile, the situation has been left as it is — art this time [10:15 am] and on this day [Wednesday, 8.10.97] — until such moment as a final decision is made.

page 45

table fro reviewing forgotten decisions

shelves of filed not too difficult ‘Difficult Art Decision’

very invisible stairs

table for reviewing mistaken decisions

shelves of filed ‘Difficult Art Decisions’ too difficult to ever solve

two folded wall protectors

table for reviewing invisible decisions

shelves of filed pretending to be difficult ‘Difficult Art Decisions’

Qty ID Medium HxWxD cm
1 encyclopaedia

pencil, watercolour and ball-point pen ink on paper (framed);

1 wall protector

coloured vinyl sheet with metal eyelets;

2 wall protectors

coloured vinyl sheet with metal eyelets (folded);

1 artwork

vinyl over MDF;

2 wall 4 and wall 5

engraved plastic wall numbers

Exhibitions
19/08/2000 Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, Dunedin Public Art Gallery (cur. C. Barton, Z. Stanhope, C. Williamson), Dunedin
18/12/1999 Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (cur. C. Barton, Z. Stanhope, C. Williamson), Aukland
16/09/1999 Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery (cur. C. Barton, Z. Stanhope, C. Williamson), New Plymouth
02/07/1999 Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, ANU School of Art Gallery (cur. C. Barton, Z. Stanhope, C. Williamson), Canberra
04/03/1999 Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, Institute of Modern Art (cur. C. Barton, Z. Stanhope, C. Williamson), Brisbane
08/10/1998 Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (cur. Christina Barton, Zara Stanhope, Clare Williamson), Melbourne
01/09/1997 Art Forum Berlin 1997, David Pestorius Gallery, Berlin
Bibliography
Christina Barton, Zara Stanhope, Clare Williamson, ‘Speaking of Strange Bedfellows’, Close Quarters: Contemporary Art from Australia and New Zealand, exhibition catalogue, Monash University Museum of Art and Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne 1998, pp.8, 24.
Robert Rooney, ‘Pursuing a minimal existence’, The Australian, Friday, 23 October 1998, p.19.