So she said 2007


Enamel on plywood; acrylic on linen and canvas; framed watercolour and lead pencil on paper

180h x 220w x 220d cm overall

Collection: Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2007)

Public collections:

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2007
University Art Museum, Brisbane, 2001
University Art Museum, Brisbane, 2001
University Art Museum, Brisbane, 1999
University Art Museum, Brisbane, 1999

more works in collections

Books:

The Missing Space Project

Six Interviews
Released: 14 October 2015

Introduction: David Raskin; Interviewed: Marianne StockebrandEgidio MarzonaDaniel MarzonaGregor StemmrichRichard ShiffRenate Wiehager; Background essay: Gail Hastings

or find out more ...

Missing

Four Sculptuations by Gail Hastings
Released: 26 April 2014

Foreword: Richard Shiff; Artworks: Gail Hastings; Afterword: Amanda Rowell. Includes sculptuations: ‘Corner Caretakers’, 2014; ‘The Distance of Doubt’, 2014; ‘Space of a Five Page Plot’, 2014; and ‘Missing’, 2014.

or find out more ...

News:

10/03/2017 Architecture Bulletin – The room issue

Gail Hastings‘ page 28 from ‘Encyclopaedia of Time in Art: pp. 28–30’ graces the cover of the upcoming Architecture Bulletin – The room issue, Autumn 2017, available in mid-March.

Andrew Nimmo has written an introduction to the issue that in part reads:

The Autumn issue of Architecture Bulletin explores what the room means to a cross section of practitioners, academics and friends of architecture. Is it internal or external? Does it provide shelter? Is it public or private? Is it grand or intimate, old or new? Does it have a function? Does it even exist in a literal sense? At its most elementary it seems reasonable to assume that a room is defined as space – however scale, enclosure, function, form and materiality are all up for negotiation. The other critical thing is that for a room to have any meaning at all there needs to be a relationship to the body, either through inhabitation or observation – and this reminds us that architecture has no meaning without people. 

Andrew Nimmo
Chair of the Editorial Committee

The autumn issue of Architecture Bulletin will be distributed to members of the NSW Chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects. Anyone can collect a free printed copy from the Institute at 3 Manning St, Potts Point. A digital edition can be found here after mid-March: www.architecturebulletin.com.au.

‘Encyclopaedia of Time in Art: pp. 28–30’ is one of 12 works from the 36 pages about time edition first exhibited in 1996 at the Chicago Art Fair. It is one of four works from the edition collected by the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, in 1996. Seven of the remaining eight works from the edition are in either public or private collections. The last remaining work is the first in the edition, pp. 1–3. Originally in the artists‘ collection, it is now available and can be found here.

04/10/2016 New website

A new website for Gail Hastings’ studio is now up and running.

Previous pages and information may be missing as data is still being entered.

02/01/2016 Review of The Missing Space Project in De Witte Raaf

Wouter Davidts reviews The Missing Space Project: Six Interviews in De Witte Raaf (volume 30, issue 178 (November–December 2015), p.25). Read review.

De Witte Raaf is a journal of critical essays and reviews on visual art published in the Netherlands.

Wouter Davidts is a Belgian academic based in Antwerp, who teaches in the Department of Architecture & Urban Planning and the Department of Art, Music and Theatre Sciences at Ghent University, with a forthcoming project entitled Larger than the Body: Size and Scale in Postwar American Art.

14/10/2015 The Missing Space Project released on iBooks

The Missing Space Project: Six Interviews was released today on iBooks.

Most regard phenomenological space made popular in the 1960s as the only type of space introduced by Minimal art. Few are aware of an alternate self-determined space made by the art, itself, that is a concrete, material space. An account of this space is missing.

The six interviews of The Missing Space Project debate the cause of this oversight.

To describe what one sees is fundamental to being aware of what one sees. Without a vocabulary with which to describe material space one, effectively, cannot see it.

The Missing Space Project explores the potential development of a vocabulary with which to describe the differentiated space of art since its emergence in the early 1960s.

Interviews are with: Marianne Stockebrand, Egidio Marzona, Daniel Marzona, Gregor Stemmrich, Richard Shiff and Renate Wiehager.

The Missing Space Project: Six Interviews is available today through iBooks at $4.99 (AUD).